Dementia - need I say more?

Dementia...scourge of our time.

Good afternoon to you! It's been a few weeks and, after some deliberation, I am going to tell you why I haven't  blogged my usua...

Saturday, 3 October 2015

Review: Rattle That Lock - David Gilmour.

Mr Gilmour has been an unknowing witness to my coming of age.
At 14 my first (Gilmour look-alike!) boyfriend introduced me to Pink Floyd, the smell of pot and Lapsang Souchon and an ever-lasting affinity with people who stay true to their first musical loves whilst enjoying all the latest bands.
So it won't come as a surprise to you that I awaited the latest Gilmour with growing anticipation. I am a subscriber to his YouTube channel, so I knew the album was in the making.
Boy, did he make me wait a long time! Years, years, and years. Two months ago he released a preview, which soon had 1,778,225 views and sparked great discussion between Pink Floyd fans and Gilmour fans and their opponents. Then, on September 18th, the CD/album was released.
I've heard quite a few vinyl snobs say that the only true way to listen to it is on vinyl. 
Bollocks! I enjoy my CD very much, thanks.

Is it any good, you want to know...
Ehm...
It has its merits.
(Ooooh, damn, what an awful on-the-fence-thing to say!)
I'll start again.

Is it any good, you want to know...
Well. I have listened to it approximately 30 times by now, and my initial disappointment has warped into a reluctant realization that it has wormed its way into my sub conscience. And I have caught myself humming the title song whilst on my bicycle, and in-between lessons. The four note signature intro (with immediate flashbacks to le Gard du Nord in Paris) has turned into a not uncomfortable worm-in-my-ear, I can tell you! 
There are many musical reminders of Pink Floyd; nothing strange, obviously. And I adore the old Pink Floyd, so they are easy on the ear.

But what I miss are the poignant lyrics. Mr Gilmour himself is quite content with the lyrics on the album, so he tells us in his 'the making of' video and with Polly Samson who wrote most of them, but...I am not. They meander on. Not a bite in sight. Nothing that comes even close to my all time favorite PF line: "Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way".
Perhaps I am being unfair here. And okay, 'The Girl in the Yellow Dress' is an exception. Still no memorable lines, but comfortable ones, nicely rounded off. And the jazzy music is wonderful, love it.

So...I will continue to play this album often, absolutely. Favorite track? 'Today'.
Was it worth the money? Sure. It is a well-crafted comfortable piece of music by a musician I  will respect until his (and my) dying day.
Here's the link: Rattle That Lock
Great artwork, by the way!!!

This photo has nothing to do with the above-mentioned artwork; it simply is evoked by the music. And I'm Dutch. Hence the cows...